Book Review: United ~ Captured by God’s Vision for Diversity

As you know, I’m taking a sabbatical to rest this summer. One of the things I will do during my time off is reading. So, you can still expect to read book reviews from great writers. I’m primarily focusing this summer’s reading on books written by or about women. I am pleased to announce that my first summer review on author, Trillia Newbell’s new book, United: Captured by God’s Vision for Diversity, is now published at UrbanFaith online magazine.

Justice in Education for All

Megan Westra

Megan Westra

I’m so thankful that Megan Westra has agreed to write about a topic in which we both care deeply about. Thanks for this contribution, Megan!:

Evangelical Christians often champion the ‘sanctity of life.’ This phrase typically refers only to abortion. Many Evangelicals argue that a culture that allows legal abortion does not truly value human life. While many Evangelicals have fought against abortion for decades, we have yet to see a movement that expands the idea of ‘sanctity of life’ to fighting for the ‘quality of life.’ If we truly believe that all life is sacred, then the logical conclusion is that once a life is born we continue to fight for that life to have equal opportunities to live up to its potential.* – Nicole Baker Fulgham

When I think about the disparities in the education system, I don’t just think about how some schools succeed and others fail, I think about the ways that our perceptions skew which schools are capable of success or failure. How the way we perceive certain students or certain neighborhoods determines whether or not we ascribe value and sacredness to their lives.

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#Justice: The Dehumanization of Black Children

All of my life I have been surrounded by the faces of brown children. I love them. In many cases, they are no different than any other children. They like to eat, make messes, and play. As they grow, particularly if they are in safe, nourishing, and healthy environments, they also begin to dream. I recall dreaming of being a teacher, a doctor, an engineer, and maybe even a fashion designer. I really wanted to be a fashion designer! No one killed those dreams in me. I had much hope concerning my adult life. Everywhere I turned, family members, friends, mentors, coaches, teachers, and counselors told me that I had so much to look forward to and a bright future ahead.

Shutterstock Image

Shutterstock Image

…such is not the case with so many brown children in America, and such is not the case particularly concerning our brown boys. I breaks my heart whenever I hear the statistics of high school drop outs, prison, low college enrollment, and violence all of which are attached to young Black boys. As a Black woman who has been surrounded by and intimately involved in the lives of Black folks, I know there are systemic injustices that allow these statistics to escalate. For every person like me who raises the issue, there are too many non-Blacks (and even some Blacks) who claim that the problems do not exist, that we are trying to play the “race card,” or we don’t want people to take responsibility for their actions. After reading this article today, I am reminded that it is us who are failing the Black children of America and we must do something about it! Read the below article by Sonali Kolhatkar and be enlightened:

Studies Confirm the Dehumanization of Black Children and the ‘Preschool-to-Prison Pipeline

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