Time: The Essential Investment

I love the Gospel of John. I find it the most theologically challenging Gospel account, and I appreciate the ways it allows us to look into the intimate relationships and conversations that Jesus had with ordinary people.

John’s Gospel includes the reverent yet warm exchanges between Jesus and his relative, John the Baptist. It gives account of the high-ranking Pharisee, Nicodemus, coming to speak with Jesus at night and then being exposed to the light that truth provides. It speaks of the gentle rebuke and invitation that Jesus offered the Samaritan woman at the well. It informs us of Jesus’ deep love for Lazarus and his sisters, Mary and Martha. We learn from the comforting exchanges recorded in John 11 that Mary was not the only one who sat at his feet to learn from him—Martha learned the deep theological truths too. In short, because of his commitment to fulfill his kingdom mission, Jesus took the time to “stop” and “see.”

Red alarm clock

Continue reading at Outreach Magazine.

 

There is a Crisis Happening at our Border

I am a black mother of a black child in America, and that means that I carry an abnormal desire not only to ensure my child’s safety but to actively pursue and defend it. I learned this from my ancestors. From the time I was a child, I’ve been made aware of this burden.

 

Harlem Renaissance poet, Langston Hughes, informed us in his poem, “Mother to Son,”

 

Well, son, I’ll tell you:

Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

It’s had tacks in it,

And splinters,

And boards torn up,

And places with no carpet on the floor—

Bare,

But all the time

I’se been a-climbin’ on,

And reachin’ landin’s,

And turnin’ corners,

And sometimes goinn’ in the dark

Where there ain’t been no light.[1]

 

This is a narrative of a woman who is not wanted in her country, and yet she wants the best for her son. She tells him that in spite of her reality and the ever-present darkness in her life, he must keep going, he must not turn back, he must not fall, and he must continue to climb higher.

 

She keeps climbing because she wants a better life for herself and her son. That’s what all decent humans want for their offspring, a better life and the opportunity to keep climbing in spite of the darkness.

biracial children

As I reflect on this artistic work, I am reminded of the human need and desire to survive. I am also heartbroken by the mothers who have similar words to say to their children, but maybe now they are saying it with a little less hope or maybe their children can no longer hear their voices at all because they have been separated.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

[1] Langston Hughes, “Mother to Son” from Collected Poems. Copyright © 1994 by The Estate of Langston Hughes. Poetry Foundation. https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/47559/mother-to-son

Book Review: Reconstructing the Gospel

Why I picked up this book:

Since I write book reviews, I often have the pleasure of receiving surprises like this one from various publishers in the mail. The title and book cover were both intriguing and I have come to trust the publisher, InterVarsity Press to discuss important topics with thoughtfulness and biblical integrity. In times like these, I really wanted to hear what the author, a white man, had to say on the topic.

Reconstructing the Gospel

Who Should Read Reconstructing The Gospel:

 

Anyone who considers themselves an evangelical should read this book. It is particularly important for those who worship in multi-ethnic churches or those who are seeking reconciliation and justice in our country.

What’s in Store for You:

This is a redemptive story about how the author, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, had to come to terms with the inconsistencies of the gospel message that was preached to him and was passed down from his parents. That gospel message was laced with white supremacy (a loaded phrase I know) but he shares honestly and thoughtfully about how that happens intentionally and subconsciously when you look at America’s history of injustice against people of color, and black people in particular.

Continue reading “Book Review: Reconstructing the Gospel”