When Women Remain Silent: Putting an end to #MeToo and #ChurchToo

Silence

I’ve had some pretty intense conversations over the past few months. As 2017 drew to a close, I was talking with a woman leader in the church who said, “This is the year that began with a women’s protest march and ended with the #MeToo hashtag.” The latter has led to the downfall of several powerful and rich men who had histories of sexually preying upon women.

Change happened because the women were no longer quiet, because sins were exposed and because the consequences of not dealing with that exposure far outweighed the temptation to deny or cover it up.

As I watched the domino effect in several professional arenas, I grew concerned that the church is often complicit to the same soul debilitating sins of sexual predators by coming to the defense of men in the pulpit, at the workplace and in their own homes while at the same time enforcing the silence of women or covering up the sin.

Continue reading my column at Outreach Magazine.

Is Learning from Women Essential for Pastoral Competence?

Woman teacher

Like so many others, I’ve listened to Pastor John Piper’s statement that women should not be allowed to teach at seminaries because they would assume a pastoral position of authority above men who are being trained to pastor. Buried within his response is the statement,

The issue, as always, is not the competence of women teachers or intelligence or knowledge or pedagogical skill. It’s never competence!

I believe that competence is an important issue of consideration in the home, church, and seminary leadership. For that wisdom, we need to look to our most competent head of the church, the pastor and high priest, Jesus, who models the seminary teaching office for everyone.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

Leadership Issue: Hello! Millennials are Leaving the Church

Millennials

Millennials are leaving the Church. That’s the conclusion that is drawn from much of the recent readings. The statement is only partially true, however, and it presents a great opportunity for the evangelical church to reconsider how she approaches the millennial generation, makes disciples, and views diversity. Taking another look at this problem offers some promising solutions.

Millennials are Leaving the Church

In a recent article titled “59 Percent of Millennials Raised in the Church Have Dropped Out — And They’re Trying to Tell Us Why” on Faith It, writer Sam Eaton reported that “only 4 percent of the Millennial Generation are Bible-Based Believers. This means that 96 percent of Millennials likely don’t live out the teachings of the Bible, value the morals of Christianity and probably won’t be found in a church.”

Drawing on information from a 2014 Barna study concerning this group of 22-to-35 year olds, the findings are consistent with reporting from the past decade or more. A simple Google search of “why are millennials leaving the church” will only lead us to draw a dismal conclusion about the relationship between the church and her lost millennials. In research for my book, Mentor for Life, however, I made a note to highlight that the Black Church is not experiencing the same decline among this coveted group.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.