My Next Book and Surprises

 

Dear Friends,

 

I know that I have been away for some time and it looks like I may have abandoned the idea of writing or have forgotten about you. Nothing can be further from the truth!

 

For starters, I have been writing a lot. Over the past year (and a little more actually) I have been faithfully praying, reading, researching, and wrestling with God (he won, he always wins) about the contents of my next book.

 

I am so pleased to announce its title, “A Sojourner’s Truth: Choosing Freedom and Courage in a Divided World,” and to share my new book cover!

Sojourners Truth Book Cover

I decided to publish this book with InterVarsity Press because of their commitment to raising up the voices of women (check out their new #ReadWomen campaign) and people of color.

Continue reading “My Next Book and Surprises”

When Women Remain Silent: Putting an end to #MeToo and #ChurchToo

Silence

I’ve had some pretty intense conversations over the past few months. As 2017 drew to a close, I was talking with a woman leader in the church who said, “This is the year that began with a women’s protest march and ended with the #MeToo hashtag.” The latter has led to the downfall of several powerful and rich men who had histories of sexually preying upon women.

Change happened because the women were no longer quiet, because sins were exposed and because the consequences of not dealing with that exposure far outweighed the temptation to deny or cover it up.

As I watched the domino effect in several professional arenas, I grew concerned that the church is often complicit to the same soul debilitating sins of sexual predators by coming to the defense of men in the pulpit, at the workplace and in their own homes while at the same time enforcing the silence of women or covering up the sin.

Continue reading my column at Outreach Magazine.

Is Learning from Women Essential for Pastoral Competence?

Woman teacher

Like so many others, I’ve listened to Pastor John Piper’s statement that women should not be allowed to teach at seminaries because they would assume a pastoral position of authority above men who are being trained to pastor. Buried within his response is the statement,

The issue, as always, is not the competence of women teachers or intelligence or knowledge or pedagogical skill. It’s never competence!

I believe that competence is an important issue of consideration in the home, church, and seminary leadership. For that wisdom, we need to look to our most competent head of the church, the pastor and high priest, Jesus, who models the seminary teaching office for everyone.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.