A Sojourner’s Truth Podcast: Mentoring Women Across Generations

Our theme for Season 2 of “A Sojourner’s Truth” podcast is mentoring. You can SUBSCRIBE on iTunesSpotify, and SoundCloud.

Check out SheGrows, A Conference for Mentoring Women Across Generations

In this episode, Natasha speaks with Laurie Polich Short and Brooklyn Lindsay, co-founders of the SheGrows Conference.

Laurie Short is a speaker, author and adjunct preacher at Peninsula Covenant and Oceanhills Church. She is a graduate of Fuller Seminary and the co-founder of SheGrows, a cross generational women’s conference to promote mentoring relationships. Laurie’s books include When Changing Nothing Changes Everything (May 2017), Finding Faith in the Dark (August 2014), and 40 verses to Ignite your Faith (coming April 2019). Laurie has been in ministry with youth and adults for thirty years, and has served on staff at four churches. She lives in Santa Barbara with her husband Jere, and stepson Jordan.

Brooklyn Lindseyis an advocate for being a mentor and for being in mentor-rich environments. As a mom, pastor, writer, and international communicator, she values relationships and supporting the potential of every human possible. She’s been a leader in youth ministry for two decades and recently launched a new community, Somos Church, with her husband Coy in Lakeland, Florida. She was the visionary founder of The Justice Movement, a global youth community that creates educational resources and events to empower youth to do justice together, and is currently empowering women through mentoring education and advocacy with She Grows Conference. She has authored eight books including “Confessions of A Not-So-Supermodel”, “Opposite Day”, “Kingdom Experiment”, “A Parent’s Guide to Understanding Teen Girls”, ” 99 Thoughts For Junior Highers”, “Sacred Life”, “To-Save-A-Life” and “Advent.”

We need to broaden people’s perspectives about what a mentoring relationship can be.


Laurie Polich Short, author of 40 Verses to Ignite Your Faith: Surprising Insights from Unexpected Passages

Recommended Reading:

Safe People: How to Find Relationships That Are Good for You and Avoid Those That Aren’t by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend

Mentor for Life: Finding Purpose through Intentional Discipleship by Natasha Sistrunk Robinson

Wisdom for Finding a Mentor

I am cooking up a lot of projects behind the scenes! One of them is the SheGrows Conference.

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The purpose of the SheGrows conference is to inspire women across generations to enter into mentoring relationships and invest in the next generation. I’m joined on the platform by the conference’s visionary, author and speaker, Laurie Polich Short, and speaker and advocate, Brooklyn Lindsey.   This is a conference series that is coming to city near you! We are heading to St. Louis this weekend, and appreciate your prayers. In the meantime, please visit the SheGrows Conference website to see how we can be of service to your church or community.

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Today, I’m sharing my first piece “Wisdom for Finding a Mentor” from Propel Sophia.

For me, mentoring started when I walked out the gate of my college campus and knocked on her door. That’s when Mary welcomed me into her heart and her home. She taught me how to love Jesus, study his Word, and walk in the Way. Then she prepared me to do the same for others. As a small group leader, Marine Corps officer, seminary lecturer, consultant, and parent, I have entered into many mentoring relationships over the years. I have been blessed by those who committed to mentoring me, and have, in turn, mentored others at various stages of their life or leadership journey. As someone who has written and coached extensively on mentoring, the question I’m most often asked is, “How do I find a mentor?”

This question meets a basic need and that’s why we need to ask. We all need companionship and wise spiritual counsel on this journey called life. From the beginning, God said it was not good for humans to be alone. The presence of mentors in our lives meets critical emotional, physical, and spiritual needs. The primary way we connect with mentors is by asking—either we ask someone to mentor us or they ask to become our mentor.

Asking may be difficult, but it is part of God’s pattern for us. When the disciples wanted to know how to pray, they asked Jesus (Luke 11:1). Jesus taught and modeled for his disciples the importance of asking the Father to meet our needs.

Asking can be complicated, too: When James was writing a letter to the early Christians, he warned them that sometimes they don’t get what they ask for because they ask with the wrong motives (James 4:3).

Continue reading at Propel Sophia.