What Does Church Hospitality Look Like?

There is an old cereal commercial that begins by panning across a field of tall stalks of golden wheat. The viewers then see an image of a large family house and an intimate group of people running through the wheat fields to the home. Before the commercial ends, the narrator reminds us, “If you feed them, they will come.”

I have thought about this commercial many times. As I survey the Gospels, I am constantly reminded of the various ways that Jesus shared food, broke bread and simply was hospitable to those in need of compassion and companionship. This is the mark of Christianity. Indeed, this is what it looks like to make disciples of Jesus. You welcome people to a table, to be present with you and the Father. You break bread together, and you eat the Word of God.

Our suffering servant Jesus goes beyond the miraculous work of feeding the 4,000 and the 5,000, plus more of their companions. Yes, he can create something out of nothing. Yes, he can fill us until we are all satisfied. And yes, there can still be so much more left to give.

Hospitality

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Natasha’s Study: The Radical Disciple

Some Neglected Aspects of Our Calling

Why I picked up this book:

Since I am a blogger that regularly writes book reviews, I received this book from Intervarsity Press.

Who Should Read The Radical Disciple:

I recommend this book for any believer who cares about practically living out his or her Christian faith. It will also be enriching and beneficial for church leaders, and those who are intentional about holistic discipleship. It’s a thoughtful, yet short and quick read.

What’s in Store for You:

The Radical DiscipleThis is my first time reading a book written by John Stott, someone who Christianity Today Leadership Journal calls “one of the giants of evangelical Christianity in the last century.” I found his writing clear and easy flowing, grounded in biblical text and affirmed through many years of faithfully serving our God and king. Stott is no longer with us on earth but his words remain to lead, guide, and encourage still.

Stott correctly understands discipleship as a call and obedience to follow Christ, and not simply a profession of Christian faith. He unapologetically calls readers to submit to the authority of Christ, and to consider eight areas where we tend to neglect or forget our Christian calling.

Continue reading “Natasha’s Study: The Radical Disciple”

My Journey to Racial Reconciliation

Journey to Reconciliation

I have intentionally been on this journey to reconciliation for a little more than eight years. It began with a simple decision of convenience. I was serving on active duty in the military, my husband had a job that required a lot of driving, we had a new baby, and were without a church home. The last thing I wanted to do on Sunday mornings was drive any distance to attend worship service. We visited a Bible-teaching church five minutes from our home and stayed. The congregation was made up of middle aged to elderly white people and we were on a very short list of racial and ethnic minority church members.

This scenario may strike some people as a surprise but being in the minority was not much different than any other college or work experience I had in all of my adult life until that point. You show up, take care of business, and go back home. Nobody talked about race or injustice. We sat in that place of worship where the Bible was preached with no connection to the community concerns and no relevance for the pressing issues of the day. During that time, I actually had more sacred worship experiences at work.

Continue reading “My Journey to Racial Reconciliation”