On Being Black, Woman, and Evangelical

On Being Black, Woman, and Evangelical

 

I’m thrilled that important conversations are taking place about the history and condition of the American evangelical church. I am humbled and honored to contribute to these conversations.

This week I’m sharing at Missio Alliance about the intersectionality of being black, a woman, and an evangelical.

Over the past few years, I have wrestled with identifying as an evangelical who is Black. The past couple years have made it all the more difficult because of the troubling marriage of evangelicalism (mostly reported by those in the majority people group) and American politics, that often does not reflect the priorities or interests of many black people that I know.

I just finished reading Dr. Douglas A. Sweeney’s book, The American Evangelical Story: A History of the Movement. While reading, I was encouraged to know that the debates for evangelicalism—what it means, who belongs in the group and who doesn’t, and how marginalized people are often left out of the conversation—are not new ones.

In fact, uncertainly about the definition of evangelicalism, its mark on the American and global church, and how that has impacted various people groups has been a reality since the beginning of the evangelical movement.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

 

My friend, Lisa Sharon Harper, also makes an important contribution here. Thank you, Lisa, for answering the question, “What does repentance look like for the white church?”

Book Review: The Next Worship

Today for “Natasha’s Study” I am reviewing the book, The Next Worship: Glorifying God in a Diverse World by Sandra Maria Van Opstal.

The Next Worship

Why I picked up this book:

I received this book to review from my publisher InterVarsity Press and I was glad to review it for my friend, Sandra.

Who Should Read The Next Worship:

With this book, Sandra presents a wealth of knowledge from her diverse experiences leading cross-cultural worship teams. Any worship leader who is interested in multiethnic ministry, cross-cultural worship, being a bridge builder or reaching the millennial generation will benefit from reading this book.

Personally, I sought out the book because I am on a search committee for hiring a new Worship Arts Director & College Ministry Pastor for the multiethnic church where I am a member. I like to prayerfully make informed contributions and decisions so I was hoping that this resource could provide insight into the world of multi-ethnic worship, and it did.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Next Worship”

Leadership Issue: Hello! Millennials are Leaving the Church

Millennials

Millennials are leaving the Church. That’s the conclusion that is drawn from much of the recent readings. The statement is only partially true, however, and it presents a great opportunity for the evangelical church to reconsider how she approaches the millennial generation, makes disciples, and views diversity. Taking another look at this problem offers some promising solutions.

Millennials are Leaving the Church

In a recent article titled “59 Percent of Millennials Raised in the Church Have Dropped Out — And They’re Trying to Tell Us Why” on Faith It, writer Sam Eaton reported that “only 4 percent of the Millennial Generation are Bible-Based Believers. This means that 96 percent of Millennials likely don’t live out the teachings of the Bible, value the morals of Christianity and probably won’t be found in a church.”

Drawing on information from a 2014 Barna study concerning this group of 22-to-35 year olds, the findings are consistent with reporting from the past decade or more. A simple Google search of “why are millennials leaving the church” will only lead us to draw a dismal conclusion about the relationship between the church and her lost millennials. In research for my book, Mentor for Life, however, I made a note to highlight that the Black Church is not experiencing the same decline among this coveted group.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.