Leadership Issue: Hello! Millennials are Leaving the Church

Millennials

Millennials are leaving the Church. That’s the conclusion that is drawn from much of the recent readings. The statement is only partially true, however, and it presents a great opportunity for the evangelical church to reconsider how she approaches the millennial generation, makes disciples, and views diversity. Taking another look at this problem offers some promising solutions.

Millennials are Leaving the Church

In a recent article titled “59 Percent of Millennials Raised in the Church Have Dropped Out — And They’re Trying to Tell Us Why” on Faith It, writer Sam Eaton reported that “only 4 percent of the Millennial Generation are Bible-Based Believers. This means that 96 percent of Millennials likely don’t live out the teachings of the Bible, value the morals of Christianity and probably won’t be found in a church.”

Drawing on information from a 2014 Barna study concerning this group of 22-to-35 year olds, the findings are consistent with reporting from the past decade or more. A simple Google search of “why are millennials leaving the church” will only lead us to draw a dismal conclusion about the relationship between the church and her lost millennials. In research for my book, Mentor for Life, however, I made a note to highlight that the Black Church is not experiencing the same decline among this coveted group.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

How to Create Safe Spaces

Times are hard. The cultural and social climate in America right now is more polarized than I have ever seen in my adult life. Everything is political. And when everything is political, people can easily forget how to respond in a civil manner. Without thinking, we can become angry or defensive, be too passive or aggressive or both, we quickly forget that there is more than one way to respond, conclude, or think about things, and we most certainly can forget the characteristic of compassion. This is what life is like in America right now.

The toxic environment of name calling, shouting, and ignoring the other has now become the norm, and that toxicity has infiltrated the church. At a time when it could be healing to draw near to others, as we draw near to Christ, we are actually pulling away and retreating to the places where we feel most comfortable, or worse, to the lonely place of isolation because we simply don’t want to deal with others.

Continue reading “How to Create Safe Spaces”

Embrace: God’s Radical Shalom for a Divided World @LeroyBarber

Tuesdays is the day for “Natasha’s Study.” It is a time of sharing book reviews, book reflections or discussions, book recommendations, or what I am learning from books. Today, I’m sharing a book review of Leroy Barber’s new release.

embrace-book-cover

Why I picked up this book:

I have been following Leroy Barber’s ministry since I was introduced to his writing through Missio Alliance. I am on the bloggers list for Intervarsity Press which allows me to review new releases like these.

Who Should Read Embrace:

This book will be a good read for those who are just entering conversations about racial reconciliation, racial healing, and justice. This book offers much theological reflection and practical application. The myths presented in Chapter 9: “Yes Black Lives Matter!” is a must read for everybody.

Continue reading “Embrace: God’s Radical Shalom for a Divided World @LeroyBarber”