Mentoring 106: Mentor for Life

We are closing our mentoring series with the same title of the book, “Mentor for Life.”

You can catch up on Parts 1 through 5 of the series here: Mentoring 101: Freedom, Mentoring 102: Mentor for Joy, Mentoring 103: Love, Mentoring 104: Peace, and Mentoring 105: Hope.

When my publisher and I came up with the book title, “Mentor for Life,” we were contemplating what mentoring for God’s kingdom purposes actually does. I have seen in my own life, and in the lives of those that I have the privilege of influencing that mentoring can indeed change a life.

Continue reading “Mentoring 106: Mentor for Life”

Leadership: The Great Female Commission

I recently had the honored of being interviewed for Christianity Today‘s CT Women #AmplifyWomen series. Check it out below.

LL NSR 2017 Teaching

As a former Marine Corps officer and seminary grad, Robinson has dedicated her career to the command in Hebrews 5 that all believers should be teachers of God’s Word. In Robinson’s view, some Christians lack the opportunity—and sometimes the initiative—to pursue robust discipleship relationships, which means they miss out on spiritual growth for themselves and others. Women, in particular, often don’t have access to the institutional structures that typically slide men into formalized mentorships. “Local churches have a great opportunity to create a leadership pipeline for men and women by pursuing an intentional model for discipleship,” says Robinson.

Drawing on her own relationships with sisters in Christ, Robinson speaks here about how to empower women across cultural divides, how to mentor millennials, and how to learn from the legacy of the African American church, where discipleship relationships are more common.

Continue reading at CT Women.

Leadership Issue: Hello! Millennials are Leaving the Church

Millennials

Millennials are leaving the Church. That’s the conclusion that is drawn from much of the recent readings. The statement is only partially true, however, and it presents a great opportunity for the evangelical church to reconsider how she approaches the millennial generation, makes disciples, and views diversity. Taking another look at this problem offers some promising solutions.

Millennials are Leaving the Church

In a recent article titled “59 Percent of Millennials Raised in the Church Have Dropped Out — And They’re Trying to Tell Us Why” on Faith It, writer Sam Eaton reported that “only 4 percent of the Millennial Generation are Bible-Based Believers. This means that 96 percent of Millennials likely don’t live out the teachings of the Bible, value the morals of Christianity and probably won’t be found in a church.”

Drawing on information from a 2014 Barna study concerning this group of 22-to-35 year olds, the findings are consistent with reporting from the past decade or more. A simple Google search of “why are millennials leaving the church” will only lead us to draw a dismal conclusion about the relationship between the church and her lost millennials. In research for my book, Mentor for Life, however, I made a note to highlight that the Black Church is not experiencing the same decline among this coveted group.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.