The Formation of Our Stories with Jo Saxton (A Sojourner’s Truth podcast)

Here is a summary of our first podcast interview with Jo Saxton! Subscribe today:

Blog Announcement

We will be publishing new podcasts on Thursdays, and they’re going to syndicate on iTunes, Spotify, SoundCloud, and YouTube.

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Welcome to A Sojourner’s Truth podcast: Conversations for a Changing Culture! I’m your host Natasha Sistrunk Robinson, and I’m glad you’re joining us for Season One where the theme is: Our Stories:

 

Natasha: Hello Beautiful People!

 

I am thrilled to welcome my first guest to A Sojourner’s Truth Podcast. Leader, pastor, and author Jo Saxton. How are you my dear friend? Thank you so much for joining us.

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JO SAXTON: Thank you so much for having me. That’s such a gracious introduction.

 

Natasha: It’s wonderful to have you. What I love, especially about the people I’m inviting to the table up throughout this season, is our willingness to share our stories, and I have invited people  that have directly or indirectly impacted my life. Jo stands out as a leader, influencer, and mobilizer of women.

 

Jo’s short biography: Jo Saxton is an author, speaker, leadership coach, and visionary. Born to Nigerian parents and raised in London, England, Jo brings a multi-cultural and international perspective to leadership. She has served on staff in multiple churches in the United Kingdom and the United States. Today, Jo co-hosts the popular podcast Lead Stories: Tales of Leadership and Life with Steph O’Brien. She is also the founder of the Ezer Collective, an initiative that creates intensives and experiences to invest in women who lead. Jo’s most recent book is called, The Dream of You: Let Go of Broken Identities and Live the Life You Were Made For.

Jo and her husband, Chris, live in Minneapolis with their two daughters. She loves Starbucks, running, her people, and the everyday stuff, like good music, good food, and good books, and Target. She really, really loves Target!

 

This season of the podcast, we are talking about our stories, and to guide our conversation, I’m using the outline of my upcoming book, A Sojourner’s Truth: Choosing Freedom and Courage in a Divided World. We will talk about the FORMATION of Our Stories, the HISTORY of Our Stories, Our Stories in the WILDERNESS, and Our REDEMPTION Stories.

 

Jo is here to talk today about the formation of our stories because what happens in our formative years really has an impact on who we become, how we grow into adulthood, what we do, how we see ourselves and how others view us. As a matter of setting the stage for our conversation, I want to read an excerpt from the book.

 

The Negro is the child of two cultures—Africa and America. The problem is that in the search for wholeness all too many Negros seek to embrace only one side of their natures.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Continue reading “The Formation of Our Stories with Jo Saxton (A Sojourner’s Truth podcast)”

Do you have something to die for?

Our country has spent the past few days mourning the deaths of Aretha Frankin, The Queen of Soul, and Senator John McCain, the Maverick.

It is befitting during times of mourning that we ponder the inescapable question:

Do I have something to die for?

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This year marks the 50-year anniversary of the assassination of preacher and civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Although this man is most known for his dream—the one he delivered to approximately 250,000 people, the dream that continues to live as a breathing document of hope today—the speech that best captures his life and ministry was given on the night before he was slain. It was titled “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop,” and in it he stated, “If a man has not discovered something that he will die for, he isn’t fit to live.”

In his sermon “The Drum Major Instinct,” given at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, he told hearers the way he wanted to be remembered. He wanted people to know that he tried to give his life serving others, loving others, being right about the violence of war, feeding the hungry, clothing the naked and visiting the imprisoned. Living an other-centered life is why his words still resonate with us 50 years later.

Continue reading at Outreach Magazine.

The Virtues of Love and Kindness in Action

One of the best books I read while attending seminary was Peter Kreeft’s “Back to Virtue: Traditional Moral Wisdom for Modern Moral Confusion.” It feels like a classic, and it is a book that I continue to revisit from time to time. Kreeft begins with a simple question, “Is virtue out of date,” and continues the conversation by asking, “Whatever became of virtue?”

He writes:

Christians like all other sinners, have always been susceptible to vice, but today we no longer seem to know what vice and virtue are.

 

The solution to the first problem is repentance and divine grace—something a book [and I would add, a blog post] cannot help much with. But the solution to the second problem is knowledge, and there a book can help.   

The thing is: virtue must be learned, taught, and practiced. This is how we increase our knowledge. Parents of young children understand this full well. We are in a constant pattern of teaching, correcting, and providing discipline because we love our children, and we want them to grow-up to become virtuous people.

The same is true of our spiritual maturity. When we grow in our understanding of the very spiritual things that we lack, we can then practice what we have learned until that practice becomes a habit, that habit becomes a discipline, and that discipline shapes our character.

When I think of mentoring as intentional discipleship, specifically regarding my mentoring relationships with young people, so much of that service involves leading a virtuous life in front of them (i.e. leading by example), teaching them how to “be” in this world, and then giving them the opportunities to practice or “do” what they have seen modeled and taught.

50 Acts Introduction

Continue reading “The Virtues of Love and Kindness in Action”