On Being Black, Woman, and Evangelical

On Being Black, Woman, and Evangelical

 

I’m thrilled that important conversations are taking place about the history and condition of the American evangelical church. I am humbled and honored to contribute to these conversations.

This week I’m sharing at Missio Alliance about the intersectionality of being black, a woman, and an evangelical.

Over the past few years, I have wrestled with identifying as an evangelical who is Black. The past couple years have made it all the more difficult because of the troubling marriage of evangelicalism (mostly reported by those in the majority people group) and American politics, that often does not reflect the priorities or interests of many black people that I know.

I just finished reading Dr. Douglas A. Sweeney’s book, The American Evangelical Story: A History of the Movement. While reading, I was encouraged to know that the debates for evangelicalism—what it means, who belongs in the group and who doesn’t, and how marginalized people are often left out of the conversation—are not new ones.

In fact, uncertainly about the definition of evangelicalism, its mark on the American and global church, and how that has impacted various people groups has been a reality since the beginning of the evangelical movement.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

 

My friend, Lisa Sharon Harper, also makes an important contribution here. Thank you, Lisa, for answering the question, “What does repentance look like for the white church?”

Presidential Elections and Why Abortion is not the Issue

Surely God is good to Israel, to those who are pure in heart.

But as for me, my feet had almost slipped; I had nearly lost my foothold.

For I envied the arrogant when I saw the prosperity of the wicked.

They have no struggles;

Their bodies are healthy and strong.

They are free from the burdens common to man;

They are not plagued by human ills.

Therefore pride is their necklace;

They cloth themselves with violence.

From their callous hearts comes iniquity;

The evil conceits of their minds know no limits.

They scoff, and speak with malice;

Their mouths lay claim to heaven,

And their tongues take possession of the earth.

Therefore their people turn to them

And drink up waters in abundance.

They say, “How can God know? Does the Most High have knowledge?”

This is what the wicked are like—

Always carefree, they increase in wealth.

Psalm 73:1-12 NIV

The idea of rich people abusing their power, thinking they know more than God, or having no regard for other people is not lost on the Psalmist. Yes, these people may increase in status, success, and wealth as defined by the world’s standards, but that is not the end of their fate.

This humble reminder is my thought of meditate today. I meditate on these words and share my thoughts not to encourage support of one candidate on another. I have no political alliances.

Continue reading “Presidential Elections and Why Abortion is not the Issue”

Book of the Week: A Call to Action

A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power

A Call to Action book coverWhy I picked up this book:

President Jimmy Carter is the author of this book, and I watched several of his promotional interviews for its release. He is a fellow Naval Academy graduate and has never been shy about his Christian faith. Due to the content his background and current work, I could hardly wait to read it.

Who Should Read A Call to Action:

This book is an important read about challenges women face all across the world, and the great work being done through The Carter Center to fill gaps and offer solutions where the challenges have gone unmet in 80 countries.

What’s in Store for You:

Through his writing, President Carter briefly shares the abuses against women, some of which result from the misreading of sacred texts like the Bible and Quran. His includes personal stories from his own life, and how his faith and convictions have grown and changed over the years. The issues raised include abortion of female fetuses (or the selective murder of girls, also known as female gendercide or femicide), rape on college campuses, wage equality, human trafficking, polygamy, genital cutting, disease and health care, sexual harassment in the military, and child marriage. He also includes sentiments about the disconnection between what people of faith claim to believe and what they actually practice, particularly when it comes to their relations with poor, women, people of color, and those who are handicapped.

Continue reading “Book of the Week: A Call to Action”