An Interview with Jo Saxton

Jo Saxton 2

Interview with Jo Saxton

 

Today, I have a special treat for you. I’m doing an interview with Jo Saxton, a leader I’m honored to know. You might recall that I posted a review of her new book, “The Dream of You” recently on the blog. Now I’m digging into some of the questions I had while reading it. I pray this will encourage you.  

 

Natasha: Jo, you have quite an interesting story. You speak all over the country and have become known as the “Nigerian Brit,” can you share a little bit about that story, and how your name changed from Modupe to Jo?

 

I call myself a Nigerian Brit because both play a fundamental role in my identity. I’m a Yoruba Nigerian, and my parents moved to England in the 1960’s. Many of my formative years were spent growing up among a wide Nigerian community in London. Nigerian food, Nigerian sounds, Nigerian cultural practices. That was my norm.

 

Nonetheless, London is my hometown; and it’s a diverse and cosmopolitan city. Its where I grew up, made friends, had crushes on local boys; I walked its streets and loved it. I feel such a visceral connection to London because its shaped me too. Still the London I grew up in is eclectic, much more so than the pictures of England captured in shows like Downton Abbey or The Crown.

 

My London includes Buckingham palace with the royal family, and Big Ben and tourist attractions, but it’s also Brixton market with its Ankara materials and meats and fruit. My London is fish and chips, and chicken tikka masala and jolloff rice. Its hanging out at the local pub and the local hair salon, knowing they house two different cultural worlds. Its reading Shakespeare, Ben Okri and Zadie Smith. Its Wham & Shalamar, soul music and Seal, as my elders dance to Sunny Ade again. All of that is the London I called my home.

Continue reading “An Interview with Jo Saxton”

Is Learning from Women Essential for Pastoral Competence?

Woman teacher

Like so many others, I’ve listened to Pastor John Piper’s statement that women should not be allowed to teach at seminaries because they would assume a pastoral position of authority above men who are being trained to pastor. Buried within his response is the statement,

The issue, as always, is not the competence of women teachers or intelligence or knowledge or pedagogical skill. It’s never competence!

I believe that competence is an important issue of consideration in the home, church, and seminary leadership. For that wisdom, we need to look to our most competent head of the church, the pastor and high priest, Jesus, who models the seminary teaching office for everyone.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

You’re Invited: Let’s Talk Mentoring!

Greeting folks,

Over the past year and a half, I have had the wonderful opportunity to share the message of mentoring as intentional discipleship with the world (literally).

Now, I’m bringing the discussion back home.

For the first time next month, I’ll be hosting a 6-week online book discussion of “Mentor for Life: Finding Purpose through Intentional Discipleship.” This opportunity begins on Tuesday, February 20th (time: 9:00-10:00 am est). It is free and available to the public.

You can participate in this discussion via video or phone conference (your choice). Log-in details will be provided upon registration.

M4L Tuesday AM Discussion

Those local to the Triad, North Carolina area can participate in a more in-depth discussion on Monday nights beginning February 19, 2018 (Time: 7:00-8:30 pm est). Again, this opportunity is free and available to the public.

M4L Monday PM Discussion

Pre-registration is required. Use this link to register and find out more details: https://goo.gl/kBrHNo 

What people have said about “Mentor for Life”:

“Bold and wise, Mentor for Life is an intentional discipleship guide for the women who officially or unofficially lead others. With refreshing boldness, this book trains and equips leaders for a great purpose.”

Sarah Bessey, author of “Out of Sorts: Making Peace with an Evolving Faith” and “Jesus Feminist”

“Spiritual growth is something we do by ourselves and is between us and God.” That’s a very American thought, but actually it has nothing to do with biblical Christianity. Natasha Sistrunk Robinson explains clearly, not only why Christians need to mentor and be mentored, but how to best go about it. The information in “Mentor for Life” will revolutionize your spiritual life.”

Shane Blackshear, Host of Podcast: Seminary Dropout, ShaneBlackshear.com

“With clear focus on Jesus’ priorities, Natasha leads us to love God, to love others and to make disciples.   She demonstrates that this kind of growth and maturity in the child of God happens best in a mentoring relationship.  Foundational reasoning and practical teaching and examples make this a fabulous tool for any church or ministry desiring to build multiplying disciples.”

Judy Douglass, Global Leadership and Director, Women’s Resources, Cru

“Natasha Sistrunk Robinson is a truth-teller and the truth is, we need truth-tellers. In her book, Mentor for Life: Finding Purpose through Intentional Discipleship, you will encounter a fundamental truth: We all need mentors as we make our way through this messy complicated world.  Read this book and be encouraged.”

Dr. Frank A. James III, President, Biblical Theological Seminary

In her book, Mentor for Life: Finding Purpose Through Intentional Discipleship, Natasha Robinson carefully sets forth a very powerful and practical way that this is done. While it is written with women primarily in mind, it is a welcome gift for the whole Body of Christ.”

Bishop (Dr.) Claude Alexander, Jr., Senior Pastor of The Park Church in Charlotte, NC

Check out these other raving reviews on Amazon!

Now you can join in the conversation. Invite your book club, small group, Bible study, and friend to join in the fun. I look forward to connecting with you soon.

Blessings, Natasha