The Power of Truth-Telling and Lament

In honor of the release of my new book project, Voices of Lament: Reflections on Brokenness and Hope in a World Longing for Justice, featuring 29 Women of Color writing on Psalm 37, I entered into a conversation with one of the book’s contributors and my friend, Lisa Rodriguez-Watson about the power of truth-telling and lament.

Lisa Rodriguez-Watson, Executive Director, Missio Alliance

Why did you write Voices of Lament now? How can this book be a needed balm in our land?

Lisa: Lament is so critical in the process of healing. As we live in a quasi-postpandemic moment, we need to grapple with the essential nature of lament in healing. There is no shortcut to healing when living through injustice, harm, and ongoing grief. Certainly, there are ways to suppress or deny our pain, but that doesn’t bring about our healing. Failure to lament only leads to apathy and the perpetuation of injustice. The gift of lament is that it allows us to name the truth, to grieve, to hope, and then to heal.

Certainly, there are ways to suppress or deny our pain, but that doesn’t bring about our healing. Failure to lament only leads to apathy and the perpetuation of injustice.CLICK TO TWEET

Why are women of color uniquely gifted/burdened with the ability to lament? What can people of privilege and power—in particular, white Christian men—learn from women of color?

Natasha: What I have found amongst women of color—and I am a Black woman, specifically an African-American woman who is a descendant of the trans-Atlantic slave trade—is that faith has been an anchor for us. The lived theology of Black women in our country is one that leans toward: “Trust the Lord in spite of our suffering. God is the anchor for our soul, a very present help in time of trouble.” The church misses out when our theology is centered on how well we can debate. Women of color remind us of the reality that our theology ultimately includes what we do—how well we love and treat our neighbors.

The church misses out when our theology is centered on how well we can debate. Women of color remind us of the reality that our theology ultimately includes what we do—how well we love and treat our neighbors. CLICK TO TWEET

Women of color have shown that we have a deep and rich faith that has been refined because of our perseverance, our suffering, and our character, which has grown in light of those things. We are able to lead particularly when times are hard because it is not foreign to us. We don’t overlook suffering or run from it. We know we can’t escape it—we are vulnerable simply because of our gender and, of course, due to our ethnic identity. Thus, there are ways we can uniquely lead people who are experiencing darkness, vulnerability, or death for the first time. This is just a part of our existence.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

A Sojourner’s Truth Podcast: #GriefAND Black Women

This season of A Sojourner’s Truth podcast is brought to you by The Voices Collection of Our Daily Bread Ministries. Find out more at experiencevoices.org. Also, check out the “Where Ya From?” Podcast. Purchase my new release from ODBM The Voices Collection, Journey to Freedom, Discovering the God of Deliverance, An Exodus Bible study

Episode 23: #GriefAND Black Women featuring sista and friend, Ekemeni Uwan. Ekemeni is a public theologian and co-author of Truth’s Table: Black Women’s Musings on Life, Love, and Liberation.  She is the co-host of the award-winning podcast, Truth’s Table and Get In The Word With Truth’s Table. Uwan is also a contributing writer for Hallmark Mahogany and Christianity Today named her among “10 New or Lesser-Known Female Theologians Worth Knowing.”   Her writings have been published in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post Black Voices, Christianity Today, and The Witness: A Black Christian Collective to name a few. Ekemeni has appeared on MSNBC, and her insights are quoted by NPR, CNN, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The New Yorker among other publications. As one who is passionate about theology, Ekemeni has a fierce commitment to the gospel and its implications for issues pertaining to racial injustice, anti-black racism, and white supremacy.

In this episode we discuss what it means to be a black woman in our culture today. In our conversation we examine what colorism means for black women and how it affects their lives. Ekemini also provides her insights about what it is like being a single black woman and shares about the grief and patience that comes with that. We also talk about the violence taking place in black communities and the grief that comes from seeing that violence. 

Thank you for joining us on A Sojourner’s Truth podcast. Continue the conversation by joining my Patreon community at patreon.com/asojournerstruth.   

For social media tag us: 

Instagram @asistasjourney Voices ODB Where Ya From

Twitter @asistasjourney ODB Where Ya From Facebook NatashaSistrunkRobinson ODBWhere Ya From

Instagram: Ekemini Uwan

Instagram: Truth’s Table Podcast

Resources

If you would like to hear more from Ekemini Uwan you can check out her two podcasts Truth’s Table and Get in the Word with Truth’s Table

You can purchase and learn more Ekemini Uwan’s book Truth’s Table: Black Women’s Musings on Life, Love and Liberation

Another resource we mention in our conversation on the podcast, which you can purchase is, African American Readings of Paul: Reception, Resistance and Transformation

It’s Book Launch Day: #VoicesofLament

Today is release day for my first editing project, Voices of Lament: Reflections on Brokenness and Hope in a World Longing for Justice (featuring 29 Women of Color writing on Psalm 37).

Learn about the book by visiting the official website: www.VoicesofLament.com.

Check out our IG Live Virtual Party. Follow the #VoicesofLament and #Psalm37Project hashtags on social media.

Purchase the book everywhere books are sold. Thank you for your prayers and support.

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