My Next Book and Surprises

 

Dear Friends,

 

I know that I have been away for some time and it looks like I may have abandoned the idea of writing or have forgotten about you. Nothing can be further from the truth!

 

For starters, I have been writing a lot. Over the past year (and a little more actually) I have been faithfully praying, reading, researching, and wrestling with God (he won, he always wins) about the contents of my next book.

 

I am so pleased to announce its title, “A Sojourner’s Truth: Choosing Freedom and Courage in a Divided World,” and to share my new book cover!

Sojourners Truth Book Cover

I decided to publish this book with InterVarsity Press because of their commitment to raising up the voices of women (check out their new #ReadWomen campaign) and people of color.

Continue reading “My Next Book and Surprises”

When Women Remain Silent: Putting an end to #MeToo and #ChurchToo

Silence

I’ve had some pretty intense conversations over the past few months. As 2017 drew to a close, I was talking with a woman leader in the church who said, “This is the year that began with a women’s protest march and ended with the #MeToo hashtag.” The latter has led to the downfall of several powerful and rich men who had histories of sexually preying upon women.

Change happened because the women were no longer quiet, because sins were exposed and because the consequences of not dealing with that exposure far outweighed the temptation to deny or cover it up.

As I watched the domino effect in several professional arenas, I grew concerned that the church is often complicit to the same soul debilitating sins of sexual predators by coming to the defense of men in the pulpit, at the workplace and in their own homes while at the same time enforcing the silence of women or covering up the sin.

Continue reading my column at Outreach Magazine.

An Interview with Jo Saxton

Jo Saxton 2

Interview with Jo Saxton

 

Today, I have a special treat for you. I’m doing an interview with Jo Saxton, a leader I’m honored to know. You might recall that I posted a review of her new book, “The Dream of You” recently on the blog. Now I’m digging into some of the questions I had while reading it. I pray this will encourage you.  

 

Natasha: Jo, you have quite an interesting story. You speak all over the country and have become known as the “Nigerian Brit,” can you share a little bit about that story, and how your name changed from Modupe to Jo?

 

I call myself a Nigerian Brit because both play a fundamental role in my identity. I’m a Yoruba Nigerian, and my parents moved to England in the 1960’s. Many of my formative years were spent growing up among a wide Nigerian community in London. Nigerian food, Nigerian sounds, Nigerian cultural practices. That was my norm.

 

Nonetheless, London is my hometown; and it’s a diverse and cosmopolitan city. Its where I grew up, made friends, had crushes on local boys; I walked its streets and loved it. I feel such a visceral connection to London because its shaped me too. Still the London I grew up in is eclectic, much more so than the pictures of England captured in shows like Downton Abbey or The Crown.

 

My London includes Buckingham palace with the royal family, and Big Ben and tourist attractions, but it’s also Brixton market with its Ankara materials and meats and fruit. My London is fish and chips, and chicken tikka masala and jolloff rice. Its hanging out at the local pub and the local hair salon, knowing they house two different cultural worlds. Its reading Shakespeare, Ben Okri and Zadie Smith. Its Wham & Shalamar, soul music and Seal, as my elders dance to Sunny Ade again. All of that is the London I called my home.

Continue reading “An Interview with Jo Saxton”