Leadership Issue: Hello! Millennials are Leaving the Church

Millennials

Millennials are leaving the Church. That’s the conclusion that is drawn from much of the recent readings. The statement is only partially true, however, and it presents a great opportunity for the evangelical church to reconsider how she approaches the millennial generation, makes disciples, and views diversity. Taking another look at this problem offers some promising solutions.

Millennials are Leaving the Church

In a recent article titled “59 Percent of Millennials Raised in the Church Have Dropped Out — And They’re Trying to Tell Us Why” on Faith It, writer Sam Eaton reported that “only 4 percent of the Millennial Generation are Bible-Based Believers. This means that 96 percent of Millennials likely don’t live out the teachings of the Bible, value the morals of Christianity and probably won’t be found in a church.”

Drawing on information from a 2014 Barna study concerning this group of 22-to-35 year olds, the findings are consistent with reporting from the past decade or more. A simple Google search of “why are millennials leaving the church” will only lead us to draw a dismal conclusion about the relationship between the church and her lost millennials. In research for my book, Mentor for Life, however, I made a note to highlight that the Black Church is not experiencing the same decline among this coveted group.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.

How Children Learn Who’s In and Who’s Out

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Racism. Racial languages. Systemic injustices and our kids.

When I was a girl growing up in South Carolina, my young sister and I had several friends we would play with at school, through our extra-curricular activities, on our sports teams, and even in our home. Even though we grew up in a predominately African American culture, we were exposed to different people groups. We were taught to love and welcome everybody, so we were not shy about reaching out to folks who were different.

There was an elderly couple who lived in the house behind us, and they had a grandchild who visited regularly. Occasionally, we would play with their granddaughter in their backyard. She was white. We were black. A teenager started lingering around the yard and would sporadically speak to the little girl.

One day, we went into our neighbor’s yard to play with their granddaughter. We noticed the teenager was standing beside her. She was older than all of us, so I didn’t think she would be someone who wanted to play house and make mud pies. But when we entered the yard, the granddaughter looked up at us and said, “We don’t allow niggers to play in our yard.” That was shocking, because we had played in her yard so many times before then. It was shocking because that’s the first, and only time, I had been called the N-word. It was also shocking because I didn’t know how to respond. I just took my sister’s hand, and we returned home to tell our parents this bad news.

Continue reading at The Redbud Post.

When Judging Pays Off

There is a blogger turned author named, Luvvie Ajayi. I read her blogs occasionally and follow her on social media. I do this for two reasons: a.) Luvvie understands the pulse of American culture (and in many ways, she is the pulse), and b.) Luvvie is laugh-out-loud funny, and I need that kind of healing in my life.

In September 2016, she released her first book of essays entitled, “I’m Judging You: The Do-Better Manual.” It instantly became a New York Times best-seller. I’m not presenting this book on Tuesdays as a recommendation for “Natasha’s Study,” although her chapters “Racism is for A**holes,” “The Privilege Principle,” and “Zamunda is Not a Country. Neither is Africa” provides the type of practical education that we all need. I’m talking about this book and its author on Thursday for “Coffee Talk” because this is the kind of thing I would talk about if I were out to lunch with girlfriends or if they were drinking coffee.

Continue reading “When Judging Pays Off”