500 Years after the Reformation

From the Mosaix website:

October 31, 1517, is traditionally considered the day that German priest and scholar Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses for consideration at All Saints’ Church (more commonly, Castle Church), in Wittenberg, Germany. Legend suggests that he did so by nailing them to the church door, although this cannot be proven. In so doing, Luther aimed to bring about reformation in the church by addressing widespread abuses in his day. Furthermore, his emphasis on justification by faith was never intended to abandon consideration of faithful witness, but just the opposite.

As Luther writes in The Freedom of a Christian, union with Christ by faith involves caring for our neighbors in love. To care for our neighbors, that is for those very different than us as defined by Christ (Luke 10:25-37), and thus to fulfill the whole Law beyond mere love for God (Matthew 22:40; Galatians 5:14), requires proximity (Ephesians 4:1-13f.).1 For Christians, fundamentally, this means walking, working, and worshipping God together as one in and through local churches beyond the distinctions of this world that so often and otherwise divide. In so doing we provide a credible witness of God’s love for all people on earth as it is in heaven.

Yesterday marked the 500 Year anniversary of this historic event. In this honor, the Mosaix Global Network has released its 95 Theses, calling for a new reformation and challenging the local church to work and worship together as healthy multi-ethnic and economically diverse congregations.

Continue reading the Mosaix Preamble, 21st Century Call to Reformation, and 95 Theses Concerning the Unity and Diversity in the Local Church.

Continue reading “500 Years after the Reformation”

Special Announcement: Preparing to Mentor Well

Special Announcement: Preparing to Mentor Well

I’m back for Mentoring Monday!

Over the past 1 ½ years, I have been traveling across the country and the world sharing the kingdom message of mentoring as intentional discipleship. I have been overjoyed to hear the impact that my first book, Mentor for Life: Finding Purpose through Intentional Discipleship has made and is making in the daily lives of people—including transformation in the ways they live, love God, love others, and minister in their local context.

Me sharing “Mentor for Life” with students in Rwanda this summer, and providing leadership training to women in Nigeria this fall. 

I wrote that book out of my own personal mentoring experiences and from the mentoring ministry that I was leading in my local church. It is my hope and prayer that it continues to convict, encourage, and help people prioritize God’s kingdom mission of making disciples of all nations. Most people do not know that at the same time that I was writing the book, I was also compiling material to prepare leaders to mentor well. The result of this work is the “Mentor for Life Leader’s Training Manual.

Continue reading “Special Announcement: Preparing to Mentor Well”

Woman to Woman Rwanda

Thursdays are our Coffee Talk days at “A Sista’s Journey.” I’m not a coffee drinker but on Thursdays I write about the things we would talk about if I were with you drinking coffee. I actually do quite a bit of talking with my friends, and don’t blog on Thursdays as frequently as I would like.

There are a lot of things I want to share with you but for today and right now, let me tell you more about my upcoming trip to Rwanda, and introduce the other women who will be joining me on the trip. I’m so excited!

Rwanda Photo_Africa New Life credit

Hope. That’s the word that comes to mind when I think about my upcoming trip to Rwanda, and my first trip to the continent of Africa. This summer, I have the opportunity to participate in a learning exchange and humanitarian effort called “Woman to Woman Rwanda” in partnership with Africa New Life. This is the first trip I know of its kind where an all African American team of women are going to partner with, listen and learn from Rwandan women.

About Rwanda

Like many of you, my first introduction to the daily life of Rwanda was from the atrocities of the 1994 genocide. I read Immaculée Ilibagiza’s story of redemption in her riveting memoir, Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust. As a part of the Tutsis tribe, she lost most of her family to the genocide where “more than one million people were murdered in roughly 100 days.” Most of this history was told with the 2004 movie release titled “Hotel Rwanda.” However, death and murder is not the entirety of Rwanda’s story. It is only a snapshot of the history of colonization and oppression that crippled the Rwandan people, and nearly destroyed the country.

In the later part of the nineteenth century, Rwanda was colonialized by Germany. During this period of approximately 15 years, Germans elevated the Tutsi tribe (as being more Caucasian) by giving them the best education and jobs, while causing a class-system and rift between the native Tutsi and Hutu people groups. At the end of World War II, the country was given to Belgium who continued to exploit this division and govern Rwanda for approximately 40 years before the Rwandans kicked them out.

Rwanda became an independent nation in 1962, but the relational damage had already been done among the nation’s first people groups, the uncertainty about the country’s future, and the struggle for power is what climaxed in the 1994 genocide. This genocide began with Rwandans, and because of the lack of international involvement, it ended with Rwandans.

Over the past 22 years, Rwandans have led their country, instituted a democracy, charted their path to economic freedom, and have pursued reconciliation and justice. Rwanda is now a country led by Rwandans, and Africa New Life is a ministry led by Rwandans.

Continue reading at Missio Alliance.