Book Review: Steward Leadership in the Nonprofit Organization

Today for “Natasha’s Study” I am reviewing the book, Steward Leadership in a Nonprofit Organization, by Kent R. Wilson

Why I picked up this book:

I am now leading a nonprofit organization, Leadership LINKS, Inc., and I want to honor the Lord with the work, as well as the people he has allowed us to serve with and to influence.

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Who Should Read Steward Leadership in the Nonprofit Organization:

This book presents a biblical and historical model of steward leadership. When pondering leadership, most Christians first think of the servant leadership model. Some might be surprised that servant leadership is not the only leadership model presented in the Bible, and it might not always be the best approach given a particular context. The author presents servant leadership as a subset of steward leadership.

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How to Create Safe Spaces

Times are hard. The cultural and social climate in America right now is more polarized than I have ever seen in my adult life. Everything is political. And when everything is political, people can easily forget how to respond in a civil manner. Without thinking, we can become angry or defensive, be too passive or aggressive or both, we quickly forget that there is more than one way to respond, conclude, or think about things, and we most certainly can forget the characteristic of compassion. This is what life is like in America right now.

The toxic environment of name calling, shouting, and ignoring the other has now become the norm, and that toxicity has infiltrated the church. At a time when it could be healing to draw near to others, as we draw near to Christ, we are actually pulling away and retreating to the places where we feel most comfortable, or worse, to the lonely place of isolation because we simply don’t want to deal with others.

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How Children Learn Who’s In and Who’s Out

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Racism. Racial languages. Systemic injustices and our kids.

When I was a girl growing up in South Carolina, my young sister and I had several friends we would play with at school, through our extra-curricular activities, on our sports teams, and even in our home. Even though we grew up in a predominately African American culture, we were exposed to different people groups. We were taught to love and welcome everybody, so we were not shy about reaching out to folks who were different.

There was an elderly couple who lived in the house behind us, and they had a grandchild who visited regularly. Occasionally, we would play with their granddaughter in their backyard. She was white. We were black. A teenager started lingering around the yard and would sporadically speak to the little girl.

One day, we went into our neighbor’s yard to play with their granddaughter. We noticed the teenager was standing beside her. She was older than all of us, so I didn’t think she would be someone who wanted to play house and make mud pies. But when we entered the yard, the granddaughter looked up at us and said, “We don’t allow niggers to play in our yard.” That was shocking, because we had played in her yard so many times before then. It was shocking because that’s the first, and only time, I had been called the N-word. It was also shocking because I didn’t know how to respond. I just took my sister’s hand, and we returned home to tell our parents this bad news.

Continue reading at The Redbud Post.