Black Christian Leaders Changing the World

My friend, Rev. Mae Elise Cannon, is senior director of advocacy and outreach for World Vision USA. She is also author of several books, including her most recent release, Forgive Us: Confessions of a Compromised Faith which she co-authored with Lisa Sharon Harper, Troy Jackson, and Soong-Chan Rah.

View More: http://meredithmacy.pass.us/natasha-robinsonIn her Huffington Post Religion column this month, she is raising awareness about Black Christian Leaders who are changing the world. Her first installment included leaders: Rev. Doc. John Perkins, Lisa Sharon Harper, Rev. Leroy Barber, Dr. Christena Cleveland, and Dr. David Anderson.

This week’s installment includes: Dr. Barbara Williams-Skinners, Rev. Adam Russell Taylor, Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil, Rev. Efrem Smith, Princess Kasune Zulu, and yours truly. I am humbled and honored to be in such great company!

 

Take this opportunity to learn about these leaders and their work!

Book of the Week: One Thousand Gifts by @AnnVoskamp

One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are

 One-Thousand-Gifts-book-coverWhy I picked up this book:

This book was given as a gift. I heard the author, Ann Voskamp, speak at the Festival of Faith and Writing Conference a few years ago, and have been longing to read One Thousand Gifts ever since.

Who Should Read One Thousand Gifts:

This book is a New York Times bestseller. It seems like almost everybody has already read it…many of them before me. As I completed my seminary studies, One Thousand Gifts patiently waited on my shelf along so many other classics. I finally picked it up to prepare my heart during the Season of Advent. It was an encouraging reminder to remain grateful, even in the small things. This is a reminder that you and I need now and always. Read this book and count all the ways you have to commune with God, experience His presence, and be grateful.

Continue reading

Worship in a Dynamic and Diverse Culture

An interview with Nikki Lerner, Worship Director at Bridgeway Community Church

Christ Church parish church in Barbados in the West Indies, interior

Nikki Lerner serves as the Worship Ministry Director at Bridgeway Community Church in Columbia, Maryland, under the leadership of Dr. David Anderson. She has the honor of leading worship for a thriving multicultural congregation of 3500+ people every weekend. In addition to leading worship, Nikki does extensive mentoring for pastors and worship leaders around the country. She is a contributing author to the Multicultural Ministry Handbook: Connecting Creatively to a Diverse World. She continues to consult for The BridgeLeader Network by helping organizations navigate racial reconciliation and matters of diversity in addition to speaking on issues concerning multicultural leadership, team-building, vocal training, and relationship-building.

First let me say that it is an honor to sit with you and I think the ministry work that you do is so very important for this critical time in American history. When we discuss topics like race, racial reconciliation, and diversity in the church, people are reminded of the estimation that by the year 2050, the racial and ethnic minorities will be the majority in America. Why is it important that we share this information with church leaders and train them concerning the challenges they will face when leading multi-ethnic and multicultural churches, organizations, and teams?

For one thing, it (meaning the changing demographics) is already happening. Also, I believe that the issue of diversity across racial and ethnic lines is God’s kingdom issue and not just a nice thing to talk about. God cares about people. I have been married to my husband, David, for 14 years, and as an interracial couple, we joined Bridgeway because we wanted to be members of a church where people didn’t stare at us when we walked through the door. Interracial marriages are a reality and multi-ethnic children are a reality, and both are beautiful pictures in God’s sight. So I do believe that church leaders have to ask the question concerning who they are welcoming—and not simply tolerating—in their congregations.

I am thankful for Dr. Anderson’s leadership and intentionality to this end. As an African American male, he is in a devoted marriage to his Korean wife, and together they planted Bridgeway Church a nondenominational, multi-ethnic vision.

Continue Reading at Christianity Today’s Gifted for Leadership.